News 2019-03-06T19:30:26+00:00

News

The doctorine of survivorship…. mutual accidents and intestacy

Perhaps you are thinking… why do I need a Will? If I do, should I write it myself?

‘The bank owns my house, I’m married so everything will go to my spouse anyway’.

Well that all depends. Is it likely your estate (including any life insurance or death in service benefit) would be less than £250,000? If not then it may not be that simple. If you have children then everything over £250,000 will have to be split between your spouse and the children, which the children will then inherit at 18.

Even if it is under the threshold – no one will […]

Cautionary tale shows the possible terrible reality of attempts to circumvent Inheritance tax and care home fees.

Awful Court case after father signs over his home to his son. I’m often asked if a client should transfer their property to their children and I would always cite cases where the later financial needs of the children and their dependants can discolour perception and lead to dreadful disputes. It’s very hard to know that you can completely trust anyone when hundreds of thousands of pounds are involved:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5933989/Frail-pensioner-76-stands-kicked-65-000-house-son.html

 

A Solicitor or a Chartered Legal Executive. What is the difference?

There are three main recognised types of Lawyer; Solicitors, Barristers and Chartered Legal Executives.

Solicitors study in all core areas of the law and are trained in usually four areas of practice, for 6 months each area. After qualifying they can practice in any area of law, regardless of their level of expertise or experience.

Barristers are lawyers who appear in Court and speak on behalf of clients. They receive specific advocacy training and are often considered experts in their chosen legal area.

Chartered Legal Executives specialise from the beginning, choosing one, or sometimes two, areas of law to practice in before […]

Guardians for your Children

When you are writing your will, often the most difficult thing to decide upon is the arrangements you would make for the guardianship of your minor children. Incredibly upsetting as it is, it’s important to discuss what should happen to your children in the unlikely event that both parents were not around to care for them. It is, however, comforting to know that it is extremely rare for both parents to die before their children reach 18.

A Will is a perfect place to appoint a guardian for your children. This way you can choose to have your children cared for […]

Lynda Bellingham Sons disappointed by actions of her widower

This tragic case shows where a loyal wife and mother wanted to use the tax advantages of leaving her estate to her third spouse, trusting that he would respect her wishes and look after her adult sons. While her husband has not officially commented, her sons are concerned at the lavish lifestyle he seems to be leading since their mother’s death and that they will not receive any inheritance from her estate and that this is not what she would have wanted. A simple life interest trust would have ensured that her husband was looked after, receiving income for life, and […]

December 2016

We are delighted to announce that Kirsty Claridge has achieved a distinction in the STEP Advanced Certificate in Will Preparation.